On this week’s broadcast of Mountain Stage - Sara Watkins.

On this week’s broadcast of Mountain Stage - Sara Watkins.

On this week’s broadcast of Mountain Stage, Punch Brothers.
Find a station where you can listen.

On this week’s broadcast of Mountain Stage, Punch Brothers.

Find a station where you can listen.

Listen to Nickel Creek on NPR’s Mountain Stage
Progressive acoustic phenoms Nickel Creek visited Mountain Stage on four different occasions during their time together. This appearance, recorded in summer of 2005, was their last before parting ways.

Listen to Nickel Creek on NPR’s Mountain Stage

Progressive acoustic phenoms Nickel Creek visited Mountain Stage on four different occasions during their time together. This appearance, recorded in summer of 2005, was their last before parting ways.

This week’s (July 20, 2012) broadcast of Mountain Stage is a special edition from our archives. Recorded in the summer of 2005, Nickel Creek, Kathleen Edwards, Pink Martini and Sonya Kitchell all share the stage.
Here’s how to listen on the radio. Next Monday, the show goes up on NPR Music segment by segment. The Monday after that (July 30th), you’ll be able to download the podcast for free. If you subscribe now, you won’t have to worry about missing it.

This week’s (July 20, 2012) broadcast of Mountain Stage is a special edition from our archives. Recorded in the summer of 2005, Nickel Creek, Kathleen Edwards, Pink Martini and Sonya Kitchell all share the stage.

Here’s how to listen on the radio. Next Monday, the show goes up on NPR Music segment by segment. The Monday after that (July 30th), you’ll be able to download the podcast for free. If you subscribe now, you won’t have to worry about missing it.

Listen to Punch Brothers on NPR’s Mountain Stage

Punch Brothers makes its third appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded on the campus of West Virginia University in Morgantown. Initially categorized as a group that inserted bluegrass instruments and sensibilities into the structure of modern classical music, Punch Brothers’ third album (Who’s Feeling Young Now?) finds the quintet reaching out to territories whose nearest sonic neighbors might be experimental rock bands like Radiohead.
The new album indeed includes a cover of “Kid A,” but Punch Brothers’ gift for melodic experimentation and boundary-pushing might be best demonstrated in “Movement and Location.” That song kicks off the band’s Mountain Stage set, as well as the album. Led by mandolin virtuoso Chris Thile, Punch Brothers’ lineup includes Noam Pikelny on banjo, Gabe Witcher on fiddle, Paul Kowert on bass and guitarist Chris Eldridge.

Listen to Punch Brothers on NPR’s Mountain Stage

Punch Brothers makes its third appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded on the campus of West Virginia University in Morgantown. Initially categorized as a group that inserted bluegrass instruments and sensibilities into the structure of modern classical music, Punch Brothers’ third album (Who’s Feeling Young Now?) finds the quintet reaching out to territories whose nearest sonic neighbors might be experimental rock bands like Radiohead.

The new album indeed includes a cover of “Kid A,” but Punch Brothers’ gift for melodic experimentation and boundary-pushing might be best demonstrated in “Movement and Location.” That song kicks off the band’s Mountain Stage set, as well as the album. Led by mandolin virtuoso Chris Thile, Punch Brothers’ lineup includes Noam Pikelny on banjo, Gabe Witcher on fiddle, Paul Kowert on bass and guitarist Chris Eldridge.

The Punch Brothers on Mountain Stage

A couple hours before showtime, Chris Thile of the Punch Brothers sat down in a very sunny room to talk to host Larry Groce about the band, music, and the new album.

Listen on the radio beginning June 8th, with streaming and downloadable goodness to follow. Watch this space for more.


Art, at the end of the day is about enabling transcendence. For me, when I hear a piece of music that I love, I stop thinking about myself and what I’m worried about, I stop thinking about what people think about me, and all these things that just compromise us human beings. I think great art lifts us above that.

-Chris Thile of Punch Brothers

Art, at the end of the day is about enabling transcendence. For me, when I hear a piece of music that I love, I stop thinking about myself and what I’m worried about, I stop thinking about what people think about me, and all these things that just compromise us human beings. I think great art lifts us above that.

-Chris Thile of Punch Brothers

The Punch Brothers’ pristine live sound involves a lot of work, and a few unorthodox tools. They’re each responsible for their own in ear monitor mix, and every member of the band was using a Line 6 stompbox modeler to help shape and alter their tone.

Great mandolin player or greatest mandolin player? Punch Brother Chris Thile has a chat with Mountain Stage host Larry Groce before the show.

Great mandolin player or greatest mandolin player? Punch Brother Chris Thile has a chat with Mountain Stage host Larry Groce before the show.